Blog


Making Tech More Inclusive: An Interview with Ashe Dryden

ACM's XRDS magazine (Summer 2014, 'Diversity in Computer Science') features a two-page interview with me. You can either pick up the magazine or buy the digital version of the article.

Continue reading →

“I appreciate there are people like Marissa Mayer who are able to make it where they are in the industry, but she’s the exception,” said Ashe Dryden, a programmer and consultant on diversity in technology.

Continue reading →

I was featured in Business Insider's list of most influential tech women on twitter, coming in at #22.

Read the full Business Insider list.



Continue reading →

The New York Times logo“It’s a thousand tiny paper cuts,” is how Ashe Dryden, a programmer who now consults on increasing diversity in technology, described working in tech. “I’ve been a programmer for 13 years, and I’ve always been one of the only women and queer people in the room.

Continue reading →

Computerworld logoDryden says there is a growing movement that is seeking to tackle technology's diversity problem. "I think that because the people that are looking at the problems of the lack of diversity are getting much more loud; so too are the people in opposition," she adds. However she believes that "on the whole, things are pushing forward".

Continue reading →

I've been doing this work for a while now, and I get asked rather frequently,

At what point do you think you'll have succeeded? What does success with diversity advocacy look like?

Continue reading →

This piece was originally written for Model View Culture's MYTHOLOGY issue in March 2014.


I'm moderately well-known for the disagreements I get into on the internet.

Continue reading →

Last week I spoke with the students at Ada Developers Academy, a programming school for women. As much of my regular audience consists of people in positions of power and influence in tech - generally men - I was at a loss for what to speak about when I was asked. I found myself nervous about speaking to them, which surprised me. After all, I've been in their position before; I should be able to relate more to them than the people I usually teach.

Continue reading →

Codes of Conduct 101 + FAQ

Over the past couple years, a larger discussion has been taking place about technical conferences and related events adopting code of conduct/anti-harassment policies. Below are some of the more common questions about and arguments against these policies.

Is there something missing from this list? Email me.

Continue reading →

Nearly a year and a half ago, an incident in the Ruby community inspired me to more vocally support and advocate for inclusive, safe, welcoming events in tech. Myself and others started by speaking to community and conference organizers about what they were doing to make their events an accurate reflection of not only what the community currently looked like, but where we wanted to see it go.

Continue reading →